Bloggership at Harvard

Bloggership: How Blogs Are Transforming Legal Scholarship

April 28, 2006

Web logs (“blogs”) are transforming much of American society, including government, politics, journalism, and business. In the past few years, blogs have begun to affect the delivery of legal education, the production and dissemination of legal scholarship, and the practice of law. We are delighted that over twenty of the nation’s leading law professor bloggers have agreed to join with us for the first scholarly conference on the impact of blogs on the legal academy.

The conference will be held Friday, April 28, 2006 from 8:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.
in the Ames Moot Courtroom on the second floor of Austin Hall at Harvard Law School. The conference is free and open to the public. We hope you will join us! If you are interested in the subject but cannot attend, the audio feed from the conference will be webcast and accessible from the Berkman Center’s home page at http://cyber.law.harvard.edu.

Wendy Gordon at DePaul

April 27, 2006
DePaul Law School
The Hosier Distinguished Visiting IP Scholar
Topic: Copyright and Ethics: The Moral Duties of Copyright Owners
Scholar: Wendy Gordon, Professor of Law and Paul J. Liacos Scholar in Law, Boston University School of Law
Admission: Free (lunch will be provided)
Place: Rare Book Room
Time: 12:15-1:30

Link: http://www.law.depaul.edu/institutes%5Fcenters/ciplit/pdf/17759.pdf

Digital Media and IP in Shanghai

SHANGHAI INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON DIGITAL MEDIA AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

Thursday & Friday, April 27 & April 28, 2006

Our forum will bring together global leading thinkers, venture capitalists, bankers, investors, professional advisors, regulators, and policy makers to explore the interplay of digital media and intellectual property from strategic, economic and regulatory perspectives …

Organized By IP First Society, a duly registered non-profit organization headquartered in Shanghai, an integrated community on creativity, intellectual property and entrepreneurship in China , with reach across the globe.

Link: http://www.ipfirst.org/DM_index.htm

Madhavi Sunder at Cardozo

Cardozo Intellectual Property Law Program
Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law – Yeshiva University
Calendar of Events – Spring 2006

Please contact, Brisette Gantt, administrative director, Cardozo Intellectual Property, at gantt (at) yu.edu.

April 26 – noon
Intellectual Property Speaker Series
Madhavi Sunder, University of California at Davis
I P3: The Convergence of Identity Politics, the Internet Protocol, and Intellectual Property

Chicago IP Colloquium

The speakers at the Spring 2006 Chicago IP Colloquium have been announced:

January 24, 2006, Chicago-Kent College of Law, Room TBD
Professor Rebecca Eisenberg, The University of Michigan Law School
Paper: Drug Regulation as Intellectual Property

February 7, 2006, Loyola University Chicago School of Law, Room 354
Professor Robin Feldman, University of California Hastings College of Law
Paper: Rethinking Rights in Biospace

February 21, 2006, Chicago-Kent College of Law, Room TBD
Professor Joseph Liu, Boston College Law School
Paper: Copyright and Consumer-Enabling Technologies

March 28, 2006, Loyola University Chicago School of Law, Room 354
Professor Jessica Litman, Wayne State University Law School
Paper: Sony after Grokster

April 11, 2006, Chicago-Kent College of Law, Room TBD
Professor Greg Lastowka, Rutgers School of Law-Camden
Paper: Digital Attribution: Shifting Information Policy from Copyright to Trademark

April 25, 2006, Loyola University Chicago School of Law, Room 354
Professor Sonia Kaytal, Fordham University School of Law
Paper: Trademark Intersectionality

For more details and contact information: http://www.chicagoip.com/

International IP Roundtable at Cardozo

Cardozo Intellectual Property Law Program
Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law – Yeshiva University
Calendar of Events – Spring 2006

Please contact, Brisette Gantt, administrative director, Cardozo Intellectual Property, at gantt (at) yu.edu.

April 24
International Intellectual Property — A Roundtable on Current Developments
Professors Katsuya Tamai (U Tokyo), Coenraad Visser (U South Africa), Susy Frankel (Victoria U of Wellington)

Access to Knowledge at Yale

Access to Knowledge (A2K) Conference
April 21-23, 2006
Yale Law School
Information Society Project

In the digital era, most multinational corporations and policymakers are of the view that the current trend characterised by increasing intellectual property rights and corporate control over knowledge best serve society’s interests. At the same time, however, a growing number of commentators believe that widespread access to knowledge (A2K) and the preservation of a healthy knowledge commons are the real basis for sustainable human development. Nonetheless, intellectual property-based approaches continue to singlehandedly dictate global legal norms and shape national legal infrastructures.

The first goal of the Yale A2K Initiative is to come up with a new analytic framework for analysing the possibly distortive effects of public policies relying exclusively on intellectual property rights. Beyond this aim, the A2K initiative seeks to support the adoption and development of alternative ways to foster greater access to knowledge in the digitally connected environment.

The landmark A2K conference at Yale Law School will bring together leading thinkers and activists on access to knowledge policy from North and South, in order to generate concrete research agendas and policy solutions for the next decade. This conference will be among the first to synthesize the multifaceted and interdisciplinary aspects of access to knowledge, ranging from textbooks and telecommunications access to software and medicines. The A2K Conference aims to help build an intellectual framework that will protect access to knowledge both as the basis for sustainable human development and to safeguard human rights.

Link: http://islandia.law.yale.edu/isp/a2kconfmain.html

Con/texts of Invention at Case Western

Con/texts of Invention:
A working conference
20-22 April 2006
Cleveland, OH

Conference Program (forthcoming)

With support from the Department of English and the Center for Law, Technology, and the Arts at Case Western Reserve University School of Law; the History of Science Department at Harvard University; the Washington College of Law at American University; and the Morris Fishbein Center for the History of Science and Medicine at the University of Chicago

This conference interrogates the social and cultural construction of invention – the diverse ways in which invention has been conceptualized in the arts and sciences in the broadest sense, including literature, the fine arts, entertainment, the physical and life sciences, law, economics, medicine, engineering, agriculture, education, communications, computation, finance, and business. Emphasis will be on the institutional cultures, rhetorics, and histories of invention across these fields. In this way the Society seeks to extend and deepen the inquiry of its long-standing project on “Intellectual Property and the Construction of Authorship” (see www.cwru.edu/affil/sce/IPCA_main.html). Papers reflecting upon the impact of the “critique of authorship” will thus be especially welcome. The conference will include lectures and panel discussions; to facilitate discussion, papers selected for panels will circulate in advance of the conference.

Link: http://www.cwru.edu/affil/sce/Contexts_of_Invention.html

Access to Knowledge at Yale

Access to Knowledge (A2K) Conference
April 21-23, 2006
Yale Law School
Information Society Project

In the digital era, most multinational corporations and policymakers are of the view that the current trend characterised by increasing intellectual property rights and corporate control over knowledge best serve society’s interests. At the same time, however, a growing number of commentators believe that widespread access to knowledge (A2K) and the preservation of a healthy knowledge commons are the real basis for sustainable human development. Nonetheless, intellectual property-based approaches continue to singlehandedly dictate global legal norms and shape national legal infrastructures.

The first goal of the Yale A2K Initiative is to come up with a new analytic framework for analysing the possibly distortive effects of public policies relying exclusively on intellectual property rights. Beyond this aim, the A2K initiative seeks to support the adoption and development of alternative ways to foster greater access to knowledge in the digitally connected environment.

The landmark A2K conference at Yale Law School will bring together leading thinkers and activists on access to knowledge policy from North and South, in order to generate concrete research agendas and policy solutions for the next decade. This conference will be among the first to synthesize the multifaceted and interdisciplinary aspects of access to knowledge, ranging from textbooks and telecommunications access to software and medicines. The A2K Conference aims to help build an intellectual framework that will protect access to knowledge both as the basis for sustainable human development and to safeguard human rights.

Link: http://islandia.law.yale.edu/isp/a2kconfmain.html