License Plates for Drones?

At the recent Drone Conference, I attended a working group on “license plates for drones.” It was a great discussion, focusing on the pro’s and con’s of a proposal Joseph Lorenzo Hall has advanced. If you’d like to hear some rationales for and against, I speak at about 17 minutes in here, in the context of a broader discussion of the relationship between privacy and First Amendment law.

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What Drives Innovation? The State

Magazines like The Economist mock industrial policy while piling praise on the private sector. The more one knows about the intertwining of state and market in health care, defense, telecommunications, energy, and banking, the less realistic any strict divide between “public” and “private” appears. Moreover, even the internet sector, that last bastion of venture capital and risk-taking, is more a creature of state intervention than market forces. As Mariana Mazzucato…

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Score One for the Commons (or maybe not)

I was just listening to Dave Levine’s interview of Mike Madison, which touched on his work with Strandburg and Frischmann on cultural commons. Here’s one more possible case study for the group, suggested by Michael Lewis via Felix Salmon: [T]here are smart [high frequency trading] HFT shops, and then there‚Äôs Goldman Sachs. The smart shops execute their strategies using lightweight, open-source, flexible code. Goldman, by contrast, considers its enormous, clunky,…

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Rob Horning on the Internet and Selfhood

Why are so many people throwing themselves into social media? I like the way Rob Horning frames the question, and a possible answer: Why are we increasingly willing to let archives and algorithms sort out who we really are for us? Is it because . . . it feels like a concrete answer anyone can understand? . . . . The techniques of the self permit, as Foucault remarked in…

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