IP and Ignorance

My views of the deficiencies and virtues of intellectual property scholarship pop up on this blog from time to time, usually just before or just after the annual IPSC – Intellectual Property Scholars Conference.  See posts from 2014, and 2010, and 2007. I am headed to Chicago tomorrow for the 2015 edition of IPSC, but instead of ranting about the state of IP scholarship, instead I’ll point you all to…

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Farewell to a Contracts Giant, John Murray

The legal blogosphere has been curiously quiet regarding the news that John Murray, law faculty member at Duquesne Law, former faculty member at Pitt Law, former Dean of the law schools at Pitt and at Villanova, and Chancellor and former President of Duquesne University, passed away last Wednesday. (Thanks to the ContractsProf Blog for a short note.  The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette published this long obituary.) The relative silence might be a…

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Innovating Legal Education

A year ago, in late August 2013, I posted a brief bit about my hopes for the coming year from the standpoint of innovation in legal education.  (Here is the link.)  By design, I was somewhat melodramatic and apocalyptic about what needed to be done substantively, and (perhaps) not forthcoming enough, and too procedural, about what I was expecting at my own law school, having been charged with chairing a…

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IPSC and the Future of Legal Scholarship

Last week I attended the 14th edition of the “Intellectual Property Scholars Conference,” or IPSC. I came back to Pittsburgh inspired, challenged, and a little … well, down. Did I see into the scholarly soul of the discipline(s) that we call intellectual property law? Into the future of legal scholarship in general? If so, I came away with mixed feelings. I’ve been away from this blog; now back to the…

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Are You Missing the Market, Aspen?

Professors are in an uproar over Aspen Publisher’s new rules for textbooks. In short, if you thought you could buy a book and do what you wanted after that (i.e. sell it used), Aspen wants to change that system. Instead of a true, unbundled digital option, it has a system where students buy both a physical textbook and a “lifetime” digital book. Too bad as there is a market opportunity…

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