Does Apple Reject That Education Has To Train Skills?

Apple’s Your Verse ad campaign poses an odd and maybe cynical offer to us. Don’t pay attention to the call of law, business, or medicine. Be a poet. Be a creator. Contribute your verse. What are we on American Idol? Or as Monty Python put it maybe all we want to do is sing. Apple panders to the look at me right now world. The film is about free thinkers. Maybe that is the same as being a poet. And as Kevin J.H Dettmar argues at The Atlantic, the film is “a terrible defense of the humanities.” He points out that the film celebrates enthusiasm over any critical thought” “Keating doesn’t finally give his students anything in its place besides a kind of vague enthusiasm.”

Having gone to a prep school, I am less upset by the film than Dettmar. But then I may project my experience onto the film’s gaps. Even before prep school I went to a grade school where the boring “Latin—Agricolam, Agricola, Agricolae, Agricolarum, Agricolis, Agricolas, Agrilcolis” was part of the curriculum in eighth grade. That teacher happened to have done his own translation of Caesar’s Road to Gaul. He’d re-enact charges of legions and evoke swords. In high school we had many inspiring teachers. They kicked our butts for fake enthusiasm. Larry McMillin once asked me a question about Shaw’s Man and Superman. I came up with some ramble. He said “That’s not Shaw. That’s just Desai,” in his Southern gentlemen’s voice that somehow had scorn yet support. Support. For what? He called me out but made me see that I could do more. How?

Rigor. To the waste bin with brownie points for showing up. Be gone empty claims of it’s good, because I said it. Learn the fundamentals. Master the material. As Phillipe Nonet said to my class in college when someone started a sentence with “I think”, “That you think it, does not matter. It matters what it says.”

It turns out that free thinking is much more difficult than Keating realizes. The rigor of learning the fundamentals allows us to be liberated. Liberal arts are about freedom and how we are unmoored from habit. But knowing the foundations is how you might see where they may not operate anymore. So sure contribute your verse. But if you want it to be a good one, let alone a great one, let alone one that might allow you to eat, put in the work. Grab everything you can from college and post-graduate schools. Contrary to recent pushes from big law (note that with 30-505 margins the big firms can absorb training costs), law schools training people to think in sharp and critical ways are providing an education that connects to the law and much more. But that requires diligence, drudgery, and didactic moments. Those happen to turn into gifts of knowledge, skill, and the ability to learn on your own. At that point, your verse might be worth something.

Intellectual Property Scholars Conference (IPSC) 2014 Announced

The Berkeley Center for Law and Technology at the UC Berkeley School of Law will host the 14th Annual Intellectual Property Scholars Conference on August 7th and 8th, 2014.  The conference is co-sponsored by the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology, UC Berkeley School of Law; the Intellectual Property Program, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law at Yeshiva University; the Center for Intellectual Property Law and Information Technology, DePaul University College of Law; and the Stanford Program in Law, Science & Technology, Stanford Law School.

The IP Scholars Conference brings together intellectual property scholars to present their works-in-progress and to listen and discuss others’ works.  The format of the conference is designed to facilitate open discussion and to help scholars hone their ideas. Papers presented should be works-in-progress that can benefit from the input provided by IPSC attendees.

Requests to Present:
  Requests to present should be submitted electronically no later than May 5, 2014, by submitting an abstract of the work-in-progress at http://ipscholars.org.  Every effort will be made to accommodate full-time IP scholars who submit a request by the deadline.  Requests from research fellows, non-U.S. researchers, and practicing attorneys as well as late submissions will be considered to the extent that time and space permit.

Presentation Decisions: Final decisions on requests to present will be made by May 30, 2014, and requestors will be notified at that time.  A wait-list will be created in order to allow some speakers to be added in the event that selected presenters are unable to attend.

Final abstracts for inclusion in the conference binder and papers for posting on the conference website will be due July 25, 2014.

Requests to Attend: BCLT welcomes attendance by full-time academics who would like to participate in discussions but do not plan to present their own work. Requests to attend should be registered at http://ipscholars.org.

For further details, see the conference announcement posted to http://madisonian.net/conferences/2014/02/14/intellectual-property-scholars-conference-2014-at-berkeley/

Peer review, replication, and thankless tasks

Peer review and the ability to test claims are powerful but not infallible. The video (here) from The Economist covers the way science and peer review may not be great or as reliable as we hope or believe. In short, industry such as pharmaceuticals, may draw on academia, but the research cannot be replicated. Pharma has revealed that issue. Many who think about this issue know that replication and verification is not well-rewarded, and so the scientific method may not live up to its potential. The chat also gets into some nice issues regarding statistics and false positives. It also looks at the failure of peer reviewers to do their jobs as well as desired (for example, not catching errors that one journal inserted as a test). And, peer review is not about reviewing the raw data.

I wonder whether open data sets as Victoria Stodden has described them will help here. It may be that modeling and other software approaches will be able to test the raw data and examine the method of collection to note it limits and find errors. Who knows? Maybe replication can be automated so that people could focus on the new work and machines can deal with the drudgery of “Yes, that is correct.”

UPDATE: I noticed that The Economist has an autoplay ad. That is lame. I have removed the embedded video but still recommend going to the site to watch it.

Dean Search – Texas A&M University School of Law

We are beginning our Dean search at Texas A&M.  The next several years are going to be a very exciting period of time for our law school, and the position of Dean will be a great opportunity for the right person.

Dean, Texas A&M University School of Law
Fort Worth, Texas
 
Texas A&M University invites nominations and applications for the position of Dean of the Texas A&M University School of Law. The desired appointment date is July 1, 2014.  Texas A&M University is a nationally-ranked, Tier 1 research university. It is the flagship institution of the Texas A&M University System, the fourth-largest university in the United States, and the largest university in Texas. Consistent with its Vision 2020 goal to be recognized as one of the ten best public universities in the nation, Texas A&M University added the first public law school in North Texas to its list of prestigious graduate institutions on August 13, 2013 when it acquired the ABA-Accredited and AALS-Member Texas Wesleyan University School of Law, which is now the Texas A&M University School of Law. 
 
Texas A&M University School of Law is located in downtown Fort Worth, one of the 20 largest cities in the nation. Fort Worth has been voted one of “America’s Most Livable Communities” and has a population of nearly 800,000. Just 30 miles separate Fort Worth and Dallas, and the encompassing Fort Worth/Dallas metropolitan area is joined by a number of suburban communities and small towns. The metropolitan area, with a total population in excess of six million people, offers a vibrant legal community supporting extensive federal and state court systems and agencies, including regional branches of the Patent and Trademark Office, the Federal Reserve Bank, the National Labor Relations Board, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and the Securities and Exchange Commission. This metropolitan area also provides affordable housing and a thriving economy.
 
Texas A&M University School of Law is committed to excellence in scholarship, teaching, and public service. With its distinguished faculty of scholars and practitioners who are recognized experts in their field; its nationally ranked advocacy programs in moot court, mock trial and alternative dispute resolution; its certificate programs in intellectual property, business law, dispute resolution, estate planning, and family law; and its strong supportive network of former students and community partners, Texas A&M University School of Law provides a dynamic opportunity for a visionary leader. That leader can help continue a tradition of excellence while operating with the new support, resources, and opportunities for excellence from a world class public university.
 
The Dean will provide academic, intellectual, and administrative leadership, helping to shape and advance Texas A&M University’s vision of transcendent excellence in research, teaching, and service. In addition, the Dean will have responsibilities for creating strong relationships with the North Texas community, alumni and the broader legal profession.  Candidates must have a juris doctorate degree and be qualified for appointment at the tenured rank of Professor. Applications are welcomed from individuals whose experience has prepared them to make strong contributions to diversity, inclusion, and innovation in higher education and to further Texas A&M University’s mission of educational preeminence. A mature understanding of the working dynamics of a law school within the parameters of a larger university system is preferred, along with experience in, or aptitude for, administration and fundraising. However, other candidates who hold distinguished records of professional and intellectual leadership or outstanding service to the community will also be considered. 
 
The Search Committee welcomes applications and nominations from interested individuals and also encourages applications and nominations of minorities, women, and other candidates who are traditionally underrepresented at the Dean level. For nominations, the Committee asks that complete contact information be provided for the nominated individual. Applications should include a curriculum vitae and a cover letter including a brief statement of interest. Although the Committee will continue to accept applications until the position is filled, to be given fullest consideration applications should be received by January 15, 2014. Applications and nominations should be sent to:
 
Texas A&M University Law Dean Search Committee
Texas A&M University School of Law
1515 Commerce Street
Fort Worth, TX 76102
Electronic submissions are encouraged and should be sent to:
deansearch@law.tamu.edu
 
Texas A&M University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. This position is a sensitive position and is subject to a criminal background check. All nominations and applications will be kept confidential. For more details about Texas A&M University School of Law, visit our website description at https://law.tamu.edu/DeanSearch.aspx

Legal Education: On Building a Vision

[Continuing my now-weekly series on new directions for legal education.  The first two posts are here and here.]

My two posts about a law school of the future were labeled “visions,” but they were blueprints rather than visions.  Visions — organizational, institutional visions — aren’t so detailed, and if there is any hope for a vision becoming reality, then it can’t be mandated from above.  Visions don’t come on stone tablets, and they don’t get carried down from the mountain top.  As much wiser people than I have written, visions get built, and they are built around values, purposes, and big themes and goals.

In those senses, I don’t have a vision of legal education.  Not yet, anyway.  I do, however, have a set of intuitions about what I’d like to do with my students, things that are rarely captured in conventional conversations about law school pedagogy and exam writing (and techniques), about faculty identity (“classroom” faculty, “clinical” faculty, “legal writing” faculty), about the types of jobs that students should aspire to securing within nine months of graduating.  Those things are important to many, many people; in their usual form, at least, they’re not that important to me.

I want to arm law students — all law students — with a sense of overarching personal capability and self-confidence that in some fundamental way can pull them through the troughs, valleys, and crises that are too often associated with not remembering the black-letter rule, not knowing how to draft a discovery plan, and other, similar nuts-and-bolts issues.  Here is why: Continue reading