Logorama

Nominated for an Oscar (er, Academy Award) as a Best Animated Short, Logorama:

With apologies for the relative lateness of this post, trademark folks: Assume that the many marks on display were used without permission of their respective owners.  Discuss.

4 thoughts on “Logorama

  1. This, to me, is akin to Richard Prince’s photography: By taking the notion of recontextualizing to excess (i.e., the whole thing consists of stuff originating with someone else), the film directly confronts the permissions culture. In other words, the more trademarks that are used, the more obvious it is that no sponsorship is conveyed.

  2. And did you see his Oscar acceptance speech – thanking all the “sponsors” and assuring them that “no logos were hurt in the process”?

  3. I love this video and an “edited” version of it will open my IP and trademark class fair use sections next semester for sure (my trademark class watched it last week and loved it). I guess it would be interesting to know which “logos” were “sponsors” and which were not. It may not be difficult to see which ones were not though … Now, is the fact that some companies paid to have their marks there make this fair use, less fair use (if we agree that is fair use)?

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